Covid, France expects to exceed 100,000 cases per day by the end of the month: “But no to new restrictions”

The forecast of the government of France: Omicron now covers 20% of new cases (and they were 10% last weekend), for the first time since May there are over 3 thousand patients in intensive care

The French government has predicted that the number of new cases of contagion daily for SARS CoV-2 coronavirus can exceed 100 thousand by the end of December, due to the spread of the Omicron variant. The government, however, at the moment, it does not intend to adopt new restrictions, as reported by the Minister of Health, Olivier Veran.

At the moment, in France, daily infections are settling at around 70 thousand; on Tuesday, the deaths of Covid were 210 (94,913 in total).

The president of the Republic, Emmanuel Macron, aims to accelerate the pace of vaccinations: The third doses, according to Veran, should reach 22-23 million by Christmas. By mid-January, the “vaccinal pass”, similar to the Italian reinforced green pass, should be introduced.

The goal, Veran said, “is not to slow the spread of the variant: it is too contagious. The goal is to limit the risk that there are too many serious cases – and therefore that hospitals can be overwhelmed by a flood ».

The incidence has reached 545 cases per week for every 100,000 inhabitants (but in Paris they are double), and the Omicron variant now covers 20% of new cases, and last weekend it stopped at 10%. For the first time since May, there are over 3,000 patients in intensive care.

The Omicron variant is causing the number of cases across Europe to rise very rapidly. Germany, Scotland, Ireland and Holland
are among the countries that have reintroduced measures to limit social contacts – with total or partial lockdowns – to stop curbing the transmission of the virus. Boris Johnson, British premier, said that there will be no new restrictions before Christmas, but did not rule out their launch in the following days, and before the New Year.

Article being updated …


Leave a Comment